Removing a laptop screen improves performance

How to save your notebook battery

No matter how good laptop batteries are, at some point their performance drops and they breathe out of their lives. The battery technology itself can improve over time, after all, a lot of money is invested in the development of new notebook batteries. But even if interesting new battery technologies may emerge at some point in the future, you shouldn't expect big breakthroughs for laptop batteries in the near future.

Even if a laptop battery is ultimately doomed to slow death, you can certainly postpone its end with the right handling. We'll show you how you can save your laptop battery and use it for as long as possible. With a little luck, your battery will last until you can replace your now completely outdated notebook with a new one with an extra long battery life.

Tip 1: Do not exhaust the laptop battery

If you use a lithium-ion battery, which is standard in today's notebooks, to the last drop, you are draining and weakening the battery. Doing it once or twice won't kill the battery, but the more often you do it, the more noticeable this effect will be and the life span will be shortened (there is an exception to this rule because there may be it is better if you let the battery discharge completely (more on that later).

The good news: You probably can't let a notebook battery discharge completely, or at least you can't do it without a lot of effort. Most modern laptops are designed to automatically shut down before the battery runs out.

Windows 10, Vista and Windows 7 have special settings just for this purpose. So that you can view these settings, click on "Start" and type in "Edit power plan". Now select "Change advanced power settings" and a new window will appear. Now scroll down and open the "Battery" settings. There you open "Critical Battery Capacity", it is probably around 5 percent, which is a good value.

XP did not implement such functions from the start, even if your notebook may have installed a manufacturer's program that fulfills the same function.

Myth: You should never fully charge your notebook battery.
This point is still controversial. While researching this article, we spoke to experts who were sometimes for and sometimes against full charging. The advantages of leaving the house with a fully charged battery and thus staying longer without electricity outweigh the small risk of damaging the batteries a little.

  1. Trekstor Primebook C13
    Screen: 13.3 inches, resolution: 1920 x 1080, processor: Intel Celeron N3350, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB eMMC
  2. Odys Trendbook Next 14
    Screen: 14 inches, resolution: 1920 x 1080, processor: Intel Atom x5-Z8350, RAM: 2 GB, storage: 32 GB eMMC
  3. Lenovo Miix 310
    Screen: 10.1 inches, resolution: 1280 x 800, processor: Intel Atom x5-Z8350, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB eMMC
  4. Lenovo Ideapad 120S
    Screen: 11.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Celeron N3350, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB eMMC
  5. HP 15
    Screen: 15.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Celeron N3060, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD
  6. Odys Winbook 13
    Screen: 13.3 inches, resolution: 1920x1080, processor: Intel Celeron N3450, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB eMMC
  7. HP 17
    Screen: 17.3 inches, resolution: 1600x900, processor: Intel Celeron N3060, RAM: 8 GB, storage: 256 GB SSD, FreeDOS
  8. HP chromebook 14 G4
    Screen: 14 inches, resolution: 1920 x 1080, processor: Intel Celeron N2940, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB eMMC, Chrome OS
  9. Acer Aspire ES 15
    Screen: 15.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Pentium N4200, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD
  10. Acer Aspire 1
    Screen: 14 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Pentium N4200, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 64 GB SSD
  11. Lenovo Ideapad 320S
    Screen: 14 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Pentium 4415U, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD
  12. Lenovo Ideapad 110
    Screen: 15.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Pentium N3710, RAM: 8 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD
  13. HP 14
    Screen: 14 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Pentium N3710, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 500 GB HDD
  14. Acer Aspire 3
    Screen: 15.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Celeron N3450, RAM: 4 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD
  15. HP 250 G6
    Screen: 15.6 inches, resolution: 1366 x 768, processor: Intel Core i3-6006U, RAM: 8 GB, storage: 1 TB HDD

Tip 2: avoid heat

Heat damages your battery and reduces its entire lifespan. When using your notebook, make sure that the ventilation slots are not covered. Never work with your notebook on blankets or pillows. If possible, place your notebook on a small elevation so that a large air flow is possible.

Furthermore, you should clean the ventilation as often as possible with a compressed air bottle. You can buy these for a few euros in any computer store. But make sure you follow the instructions on the bottle and only do this when your notebook is switched off.

Tip 3: give your notebook battery a break

If you will only be working on the mains for a week or more, remove the notebook battery beforehand. Otherwise, you will wear out the battery by charging and discharging it all the time without any benefit to you. Furthermore, you warm up the battery (see above: "Avoid heat").

You should avoid removing an empty battery from your notebook, because even an unused battery will lose its stored energy over time. You certainly don't want all of the power to be lost, so remove the battery when it's half full.

Never remove the battery while your notebook is still switched on, in standby or in sleep mode. This would cause your system to crash and possibly damage your hardware. Even plugging in the battery while your laptop is running can damage the system. So only remove and connect the battery when your notebook is completely switched off.

If you've never removed your notebook battery and you don't know how to do it, read your notebook's user manual. (If you don't have it anymore, you can probably find it online). The instructions usually require you to turn your notebook over and press a button on the bottom of the notebook while you remove the battery.

Myth: keep your laptop battery cool.
Some people recommend that you keep the battery sealed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. While you are storing your battery in a cool place, you should try to avoid getting your battery wet. But there is a real risk of water condensation in the refrigerator, so you should store your laptop battery in a dry place at room temperature. A simple filing cabinet does this very well.

However, you should not leave the laptop battery unused or completely discharged for too long. If you are not going to use your battery for more than two months, put the battery in your notebook for a few hours and use it for a while. You can then remove the battery again.

Furthermore, you should plan to charge your battery for at least a few hours before traveling. It would of course be better if you fully charge the battery before unplugging your notebook.