How heavy is the paper from ISRO

How can ISRO's RISAT satellites search for the lost IAF AN-32?

RISAT-1 and RISAT-2 both carry radar systems with a synthetic aperture that can be used to create detailed maps of the surface below. There has been talk of using these systems to identify wreckage on the ground for some time, but in the late 1990s when many of these ideas were proposed, the resolution was simply too low to make it a reliable option . NASA has done some research in this area as well, but it has been suspended indefinitely for quite some time.

Here is a sample paper from the late 90's

http://wmsmir.cits.rncan.gc.ca/index.html/pub/geott/ess_pubs/219/219846/13148.pdf

Abstract: (focus on mine)

This article summarizes some of the results of studies at the Canada Center for Remote Sensing (CCRS) that used Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from space-based systems to detect crashed aircraft. Studies were carried out with detected products (only intensity values) and interferometric methods (using complex images). Due to the low resolution of single polarization and single frequency space-based SAR images (around 8 meters of ground range is the best currently available from operational remote sensing satellites), it is determined that such images cannot be used with much optimism at this time, despite the techniques themselves are promising. Further study is needed to investigate whether the better resolutions that will be available from future systems such as RADARSAT-2 will allow for reliable detection of crashed aircraft. Additional research not described in this manuscript is being conducted at the CCRS, with assistance from the National Search and Rescue Secretariat, to examine the search and rescue contributions that can be made with space-based polarimetric SAR systems, including RADARSAT-2.

According to this article, RISAT-1 has a resolution that can be varied between 50 m and 3 m, and a "spotlight mode" in which this resolution can be up to 1 m. This is definitely in the area where it could be useful if we have a general idea of ​​where to look.

Realistically, I'm not sure how much the satellites will do, especially when compared to the planes and submarines already in service, but it's an idea that works in theory so you can't really blame them for anything.