What does adulthood mean to you

ADHD in adults

ADHD is less obvious in adults than in hyperactive, "fidgety" children and adolescents. Above all, adults with ADHD have problems organizing their everyday life or work, concentrating on tasks for long periods of time, meeting deadlines or paying bills.

But they are also very impulsive. For example, adults with ADHD talk a lot and often interrupt others. Some get into trouble quickly, terminate relationships prematurely, switch jobs straight away or quit before they have a new job. Difficulties can also arise in traffic, for example from reckless driving.

Many adults with ADHD struggle to keep their emotions balanced. They are easily irritable, prone to outbursts of anger, and have a low tolerance for frustration. When they are stressed, they find it difficult to perform their duties. Adults with ADHD can also have difficulty setting goals and achieving them.

The public and some experts are still debating whether ADHD actually exists in adulthood. Many specialist societies in Germany now recognize ADHD in adults as. Drug treatment has now also been approved.

It is crucial: If someone has psychological problems that significantly impair their quality of life over a long period of time, it makes sense to seek professional advice. It is also important that an ADHD diagnosis is made carefully to avoid unnecessary or incorrect treatments.