Node js developers are in demand

"If you use Node.js, you are doing something wrong in your life," says Toby DiPasquale on his blog. Even the approach of using the V8 engine of the Chromium project on servers is complete

"If you use Node.js, you are doing something wrong in your life," says Toby DiPasquale on his blog. Even the approach of using the V8 engine of the Chromium project on servers is completely wrong. In his company this is the number one source of error in the internal list of open issues. In addition, Node is much slower than non-optimized Scala.

In all his years as a server programmer, DiPasquale has never seen such an uncomfortable framework as Node.js. After just six months, it is impossible to understand one's own developments. And the model that all processes run simultaneously using old browser components and JavaScript is causing him a headache.

What upsets DiPasquale most about the Node.js hype is the widespread assumption that scalability is the same as speed and that CPU performance is no longer important because events no longer block and everything is on one CPU core running.

Finally, DiPasquale criticizes JavaScript as the language basis for a tool like Node.js. Even Ruby and Python now understand dependency injection and have understood that modularization brings long-term benefits if you want to maintain a project over long periods of time. JavaScript refrains from such important findings and in this respect represents a step backwards, says DiPasquale.

It is interesting to see how few voices are against Node.js, but how specific the individual criticisms are. Nicolas Cannasse criticizes the lack of fairness as well as the inevitability of Starving (see Cannasse's explanation). The anonymous blogger FSK only looked at Node.js for a few minutes and came to the same conclusion as DiPasquale. There is heated debate on Ycombinator, and the question is whether there aren't better alternatives (Erlang, Twisted (Python), EventMachine (Ruby)) to eliminate the IO bottleneck (which coincides with DiPasquale's fear that Node.js. Case of "Worse is Better").

Our editorial team recommends: