What are the tools of the lesson

This is how digital tools enrich the classroom

In the digital classroom, students become active themselves, get involved and help shape the lessons. Different methods are used for different tasks.

Especially with a view to the increasing social diversity, which is also reflected in the increasingly different learning requirements and levels in individual classrooms, digital media have great potential, provided their use is embedded in an individually encouraging teaching and learning culture. They can help to tailor content, paths and learning methods to the needs of the individual student, but must never become an end in itself. The focus must always be on the goal that all students can learn successfully according to their individual requirements and are supported by the use of digital media in the classroom.

Digital tools support an action-oriented and development-oriented design of the lesson: Educators such as Professor Dr. Silke Grafe from the Institute for School Education at the University of Würzburg assume that children learn best when their experiences, their thinking and their actions are linked. This is exactly what happens when teachers use digital tools in the classroom: the students become active themselves, get involved and help shape the lesson.

Different methods for different tasks

According to Grafe, teaching and learning must each start from a task that is meaningful for the student. Such tasks can be, for example:

  • Problem tasks: Problems encourage learning when there are no routines for dealing with them. Just think of the kindergarten child who can only build a high tower out of wooden blocks by trying out different constructions. Problem tasks offer students the chance to get to know, discuss and evaluate different solutions. Webquests, i.e. solving tasks through research on the Internet, are a well-known method for solving problem tasks. For example, there are web quests that help students step by step to compare the folk tale Hansel and Gretel with a modern form - and to write a modern form of another fairy tale such as Sleeping Beauty themselves.
  • Decision-making tasks: They make it easier for students to get to know, discuss and evaluate different points of view and alternative courses of action - in order to come to their own decision. A digital tool can be used, for example, in which a teacher has all students evaluate statements about previously imparted specialist knowledge as correct or incorrect. You tick which statements apply or not - and justify this in the lesson. The results can then be compared in class.
  • Design tasks: The students can creatively create texts, audios, videos, animations or presentations. An example of this is the use of digital tools such as video for the news broadcast described above.
  • Assessment tasks: They can refer to problem solutions, decision cases or design results. For example, the students think about criteria with which they want to analyze and evaluate presentations within the class. On this basis, an assessment sheet can be created, which can be created and evaluated with the help of digital tools.

This article comes from our brochure “Teaching and learning with digital tools”. Are you looking for more ideas for a lesson that encourages students' curiosity and natural thirst for knowledge? You can download the brochure free of charge:

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